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Wednesday June 20, 2018

NY Convergence ORIGINAL

Lessons From Bad Social Media Round Out Social Media Week

by Esther Surden

As NY’s Social Media Week culminated this past weekend,  NY Convergence attended the “Suxorz Awards” event, where the “Worst Social Media Campaigns” of the past year were selected.  Of the week’s events, this one was the one that pointed out what good social media practitioners should not do.

The sometimes raucous event was moderated by Henry Copeland who led a panel of social media luminaries who presented some campaigns that never took off, some that were misguided, and some that were unintentionally funny.  Companies that misused social media sites were also highlighted. Although this was a social media event, audience members were told to turn off their phones and not to Tweet during the proceedings.

The panel nominated social media campaigns in four categories. In the category called “Meme Purgatory,” all about brands that couldn’t control their social media campaigns, Cisco won for its “Ted from Accounting” series of videos that were deemed so annoying they never went viral. with “Ted,” some thought that Cisco was trying to mimic the successful Old Spice Man campaign.

A couple of campaigns were noteworthy in the “Missed Connections” category, which took a look at campaigns that missed out on the meaning of social networking or just went askew. Starbucks was one nominee – as explained to the audience, a spontaneous Facebook fan page emerged, with real fans trying to bring Starbucks to city of Budapest. Starbucks listened to its fans and finally opened in the city, but when the coffee house finally got there, it shut down the original fan site. The restaurant chain Denny’s, however, got the biggest laughs and won the round by directing its users to a Twitter account held by a Taiwanese boy, taking a long time to realize its mistake.

In a category named “Mean People Suck, ” the panel took on companies and social media managers that acted inappropriately. The winner in this category was Pricechopper. As described by the panel, when a user posted a derogatory message about Pricechopper on Twitter, the social media manager found the poster’s employer and called them to try to get the poster  fired from his or her job.  In another category, celebrities’ misuse of Twitter was documented, and Kenneth Cole and LeBron James among others, came in for criticism for using Twitter outrageously.  James teased followers about which team he would end up with and Cole was criticized for his comments about Egypt.

The event ended with audience members submitting their own nominees.  Among others, audience members nominated Charmin, just for having a Facebook page, and BP, for all of its various missteps relating to the oil spill, with BP coming out the winner.