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Sunday December 21, 2014

Spotlight on a New Generation of Male Fashion Bloggers

There’s a new breed of fashion bloggers—young males who obsess about style they same way other men obsess over Italian sports cars.

“There’s the same attention to detail,” Tyler Thoreson, editorial director of Park & Bond, told the New York Times. The new bloggers, mostly NYers—also part-videographer, publicist and retail-wrangler—are writing for a post-metrosexual world.

Lawrence Schlossman, who blogs at Sartorially Inclined, told the Times that a metrosexual is “the darkest period in recent history when it comes to menswear. It was a movement pushed by girlfriends who wanted their boyfriends to look presentable, and perpetuated by Bravo.” He writes about 30 blog posts a day, advising his readers about what jeans to buy and that bow-ties are a “style crutch.”

Michael Williams  created a “type” at A Continuous Lean, a blog devoted to a heritage-chic—selvage denim, Barbour jackets and Red Wing boots. He supplements his income as a fashion expert and designer, collaborating with J. Crew, Gant and Steven Alan. He’s even appeared in Bushmills whiskey ads.

Mister Mort was conceived by Mordechai Rubinstein. A Hasidic Jew studying in an Israeli rabbinical school, he moved to New York in ’94 and started a career in fashion. His blog is devoted to documenting the clothes of men from New York and San Francisco. He told the Times his typical reader is “a man wearing a three-piece suit, a Borsalino hat and cashmere socks.”

The Marcus Troy Experience is a more journalist enterprise. Troy, who lives in Montreal, actually visits the stores. He also writes about travel, gadgets and music. In addition to heaps of swag, he gets 150,000 monthly page views. Readers seeking help send him photos of their outfits.

The Jake Davis Blog unites the worlds of fashion, video and commercials. He’s often sought out by brands who seek a cinematic touch. “I don’t call what it is I do fashion,” Davis told the Times. “And it’s not even style, but more just what it means to be the man.

The New York Times